Nemo Me Impune Lacessit

Sunday, 22 March 2009

Sol vs. The CNMone? [CNM Dissent]

Filed under: Education — Tags: , , , , , — mikewb1971 @ 2:26 AM (02:26)

Current mood: amused, annoyed

Recently, CNM selected the name for the school’s proposed mascot — “Sol the SunCat.”[1]

Here’s three proposed pictures of “Sol” —

Does the mascot come with a UNM-style athletics program and a bunch of coaches with the I’m-outta-here-if-I-don’t-get-the-raise-I-want attitude?

This entry (rather sarcastic, and rightfully so, in my opinion) is hands-down the best of the bunch —


What the CNM Mascot would look like if scientists ruled the school. 🙂
The CNMone (C-N-M-o-n-ee)

Why do I say it’s the best? It’s not for the quality of the artwork, as “The CNMone” is a hand-drawn sketch, as the others have the look of being put together by someone with some skills in the graphic arts. No, “The CNMone” is the best as it showcases the absurdity of the whole mascot gimmick.

Apparently, I’m not alone in thinking that this whole scheme to “market” the school is idiotic. Here’s the comments that were printed in the Chronicle

I think they’re pretty tight, I mean some of them look kind of corny, but that little one does look pretty tight [center Suncat]. But I wouldn’t wear that sh*t on a shirt.
Tom Cordova

It looks like an elementary school mascot, not one for a college
Kelly Simpson

It’s pathetic, I don’t even really know what it is. Are those flames, or what are they supposed to be? It looks like a pokemon.
Ashley Gabaldon

It [expletive] sucks. I don’t even know what the [expletive] that is. No, this is not high school, this is college, get it together.
Shavon Davis

I don’t like it, I just don’t think it will catch on.
Megan Galles

Kirsten Crocker knocks this BS ball out of the park with her op-ed piece titled “CNM to be laughing stock of collegiate community” —

One of the perks of being a pessimist is that reality rarely presents you with scenarios that are worse than you had originally anticipated. So, naturally, I was utterly flabbergasted when I first caught sight of CNM’s official mascot prototypes. My default response of genuine amusement kicked in immediately; my laughter came to a tapered squelch, however, as I realized this was no joke.

A mascot is, by definition, supposed to be a representative symbol of an institution, ergo a group of people. How do these prototypes represent CNM? Well, they certainly imply that we have a serious case of dignity deficiency, and make it painstakingly obvious that we don’t even take ourselves seriously. These god-awful designs also relay a warning not to take CNM’s computer animation courses.

If I recall correctly the student voting on the mascot several months back — you know, the great hoax which had its preconcieved notions and didn’t for a moment consider the actual wishes of the student body — I believe the consensus had voted for the implementation of a roadrunner as the mascot. On what grounds was that idea poo-pooed? Given our location, a roadrunner seems a perfectly acceptable critter of choice. If you’ve ever seen one combination prowling-scurrying through your yard, you can’t deny that the roadrunner is a creature of majesty which commands respect; “I used to be a dinosaur, b****.”

We have until March 20 to protest these abominations, ladies and gentlemen. I would encourage you, if you would prefer not to be the laughing stock of the collegiate community, to pencil in your suggestions, perhaps a word or two of protest, on the ballots as opposed to degrading yourselves and voting on one of the strkingly similar prototypes. These things should be trapped inside the virtual realm of a Giga Pet, not ironed onto college T-shirts.


NOTES

  1. Original posting at CNM Dissent – Announcing . . . “Sol” the “Suncat”
  2. Original article

Copyright © 2009 Mike Blessing. All rights reserved.
Produced by KCUF Media, a division of Extropy Enterprises.
This blog entry created with Notepad++.

bomb gun firearm steak knife Allah Aryan airline hijack

Advertisements

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: